PBA South Rocky Mount Open

by PBA Editor April 26, 2002 19:00
The top 5 positions did not change the last 5 games of match play before the position round. In the final game of match play, Ken Simard defeated Erik Ramos 240 - 170 to go from 4th to 3rd. John May threw 3 strikes in the tenth to force Stoney Baker to do the same so that he could hang on to the 5th position. Jason Couch moved a little closer to Patrick but could not catch him. Top 5 for Stepladder Finals: 1st Patrick Allen +1295 2nd Jason Couch +1200 3rd Ken Simard +922 4th Erik Ramos +885 5th Stoney Baker +675 Match 1 The score speaks for itself. Stoney Baker 207 Erik Ramos 136 Match 2 Stoney started off with the first 7 and never gave Ken a chance. Stoney Baker 268 Ken Simard 173 Match 3 Stoney could not quite find the pocket this game, like he had the first 2 games, but he did manage to strike out in the 10th frame to force Couch to mark. Jason had a hard time knocking over the 7 pin throughout the game but flushed the first ball in the 10th to seal the victory. The talk has begun for the next match, Couch telling the Mop to "Bring it On" Stoney Baker 203 Jason Couch 206 Match 4 Jason Couch X 9/ X 7/ X X X X 9/ X81 20 40 60 80 110 140 169 189 209 228 Patrick Allen X 9/ 9/ X X X X X X XXX 20 39 59 89 119 149 179 209 239 269 6 JOHN MAY - LINCOLNTON,NC 1794 1712 1689 5195 216.46 9 7 0 5465 +665 10 $700 7 WES GODWIN - MONROE,NC 1762 1710 1703 5175 215.63 9 7 0 5445 +645 30 $600 8 NORM TITUS - SEBRING, FL 1797 1799 1587 5183 215.96 7 9 0 5393 +593 82 $575 9 JASON HURD - TITUSVILLE, FL. 1799 1668 1676 5143 214.29 7 9 0 5353 +553 122 $550 10 CHRIS HAYDEN - TAMPA, FL 1771 1765 1567 5103 212.63 7 9 0 5313 +513 162 $525 11 RYAN SMITH - ASHBORO, NC 1760 1791 1571 5122 213.42 6 10 0 5302 +502 173 $500 12 MIKE ROBERTS - FT. LAUDERDALE, FL 1766 1675 1620 5061 210.88 8 8 0 5301 +501 174 $475 13 CHIP COLLINS - FAYETTEVILLE,NC 1759 1772 1547 5078 211.58 7 9 0 5288 +488 187 $450 14 ANDY ZOOK - RALEIGH,NC 1772 1519 1807 5098 212.42 5 11 0 5248 +448 227 $425 15 CHRIS COLLINS - FAYETTEVILLE,NC 1778 1553 1594 4925 205.21 7 9 0 5135 +335 340 $410 16 RICHARD CHURCH - LAKELAND,FL 1764 1678 1459 4901 204.21 6 10 0 5081 +281 394 $400 For the rest of the scores please go to pbamembers.com Click on Tournament Info Click on South Scroll down to the tournament name and click on it.
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Gold-Panner Leads Seniors to Ohio

by PBA Editor April 26, 2002 19:00
Photo: Al Sanford, two-time PBA Senior Tour titleholder.
Sanford, Jackson, Ohio, bowls at Shawnee Lanes when he’s not battling PBA legends like Johnny Petraglia, Mark Roth and Dave Soutar on the Senior Tour. “I practice here just about every day,” said the two-time senior champion. “I live 45 miles from here, but this is my home center. In my mind, I always thought this is one of the best places we could ever bowl.” In late 2000, Sanford first approached the center’s proprietor, Pat Highland, about potentially hosting a PBA Regional event. Logistically, the tournament failed to come together. However, that didn’t stop Sanford. A wise prospector knows to remain patient when he’s on to something. When it was announced in 2001 that the PBA National Tour would move to a seasonal schedule (September-March), it meant big changes were on the horizon for the Senior Tour. “Our schedule dropped (in number of events) some this year,” he said. “For a while, it even looked like we would have fewer tournaments than we have now. That’s when I approached Pat about the opportunity of hosting the Senior Tour. “If he’s not the most enthusiastic guy around, he’s gotta be up there,” said Sanford about Highland. “He is well respected in the community and is a very good promoter.” Highland operates the immaculate 43-year-old, 40-lane bowling center and does so successfully. But admittedly, he wasn’t totally sure how to successfully host a PBA Senior Tour event. That’s where Sanford’s expertise proved handy. “Al has been instrumental in helping me understand what would and wouldn’t work,” commented Highland. Sanford, a 10-year senior veteran, has seen what it takes to pull-off a great PBA stop. His experience, coupled with Highland’s enthusiasm and respect in the local business community has made for a flourishing tandem. Sanford devised the popular open bowling with the pros and shootout formats, which kicked-off the tournament Friday night, and convinced Highland that, with added prize money for the shootout, would provide the added incentive needed to attract this week’s extremely strong field. It worked. And the fans turned out in droves to not only watch, but interact with the pros. “I saw nothing but smiles up and down the approaches,” said Sanford. “It got everybody involved and the fans loved it. If you can get the fans to feel like they’re part of it, you’ve really got fans then.” Most fans look forward to watching the pros compete this week, too. So, how did Sanford conjure the idea? “I was out panning for gold and it just hit me,” he said. “I really though Pat could make it work for his business. I knew the fans would come out to bowl with 15 stars they grew up watching on ABC-TV – and myself (he humbly joked). I felt all along that we had to get the fans more involved.” So, what’s the deal with the prospecting? “That’s my hobby,” Sanford said. “We do it two-three months out of the year, mostly in the high desert of California. Bowling is fun, but nothing compares to the thrill of panning for gold. My wife once found $2,000 worth of gold in a single pan.” When asked where they found the riches, Sanford answered, “Prospectors never tell where they find their gold.” Well, this week, your secret is out, Al… it’s in Chillicothe, Ohio, at Shawnee Lanes.
TOURNAMENT ARCHIVE SHOOTOUT TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE
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Gold-Panner Leads Seniors to Ohio

by PBA Editor April 26, 2002 19:00
As an experienced prospector, Al Sanford knows a golden opportunity when he sees it. He’s a big reason why this week’s PBA Senior Chillicothe Open is panning out to be one of the Senior Tour’s best events. Sanford, Jackson, Ohio, bowls at Shawnee Lanes when he’s not battling PBA legends like Johnny Petraglia, Mark Roth and Dave Soutar on the Senior Tour. “I practice here just about every day,” said the two-time senior champion. “I live 45 miles from here, but this is my home center. In my mind, I always thought this is one of the best places we could ever bowl.” In late 2000, Sanford first approached the center’s proprietor, Pat Highland, about potentially hosting a PBA Regional event. Logistically, the tournament failed to come together. However, that didn’t stop Sanford. A wise prospector knows to remain patient when he’s on to something. When it was announced in 2001 that the PBA National Tour would move to a seasonal schedule (September-March), it meant big changes were on the horizon for the Senior Tour. “Our schedule dropped (in number of events) some this year,” he said. “For a while, it even looked like we would have fewer tournaments than we have now. That’s when I approached Pat about the opportunity of hosting the Senior Tour. “If he’s not the most enthusiastic guy around, he’s gotta be up there,” said Sanford about Highland. “He is well respected in the community and is a very good promoter.” Highland operates the immaculate 43-year-old, 40-lane bowling center and does so successfully. But admittedly, he wasn’t totally sure how to successfully host a PBA Senior Tour event. That’s where Sanford’s expertise proved handy. “Al has been instrumental in helping me understand what would and wouldn’t work,” commented Highland. Sanford, a 10-year senior veteran, has seen what it takes to pull-off a great PBA stop. His experience, coupled with Highland’s enthusiasm and respect in the local business community has made for a flourishing tandem. Sanford devised the popular open bowling with the pros and shootout formats, which kicked-off the tournament Friday night, and convinced Highland that, with added prize money for the shootout, would provide the added incentive needed to attract this week’s extremely strong field. It worked. And the fans turned out in droves to not only watch, but interact with the pros. “I saw nothing but smiles up and down the approaches,” said Sanford. “It got everybody involved and the fans loved it. If you can get the fans to feel like they’re part of it, you’ve really got fans then.” Most fans look forward to watching the pros compete this week, too. So, how did Sanford conjure the idea? “I was out panning for gold and it just hit me,” he said. “I really though Pat could make it work for his business. I knew the fans would come out to bowl with 15 stars they grew up watching on ABC-TV – and myself (he humbly joked). I felt all along that we had to get the fans more involved.” So, what’s the deal with the prospecting? “That’s my hobby,” Sanford said. “We do it two-three months out of the year, mostly in the high desert of California. Bowling is fun, but nothing compares to the thrill of panning for gold. My wife once found $2,000 worth of gold in a single pan.” When asked where they found the riches, Sanford answered, “Prospectors never tell where they find their gold.” Well, this week, your secret is out, Al… it’s in Chillicothe, Ohio, at Shawnee Lanes.
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Lihue, Hawaii final results

by PBA Editor April 22, 2002 19:00
Dave Arnold had lead most of the finals but Marv Sargent overtook him by 7 pins going into the final game on the heels of a 228-195 match win over Arnold in game 11. The position round rematch took place on the same pair but the outcome would be different this time as Arnold won 194-172 to capture the tournament title. In the final game, Arnold could have shut out Sargent but missed a 10 pin in the 9th frame. With Sargent working on a double, if Marv strikes on the first ball in the 10th frame, he wins. But it was not to be as Sargent missed the headpin and Arnold was the chmapion. This is Dave Arnold's 6th Regional title to go along with 3 National titles. Dave was a last minute entrant in the Hawaii tournaments, finding a great travel deal via the internet. 3rd Ann. Rice Shopping Center Open Lihue Bowling Center, Lihue, Hawaii, April 21-23, 2002 Match Play Standings after 22 Games Pos Name - Hometown Pins W L T Bon Pins Prize 1 Arnold, Dave - Reno, NV 4583 8- 4-0 240 4823 $2000.00 2 Sargent, Marv - Temecula, CA 4538 8- 4-0 240 4778 $1200.00 3 Leverage, David - Peoria, AZ 4550 7- 5-0 210 4760 $1000.00 4 Woods, Curtis - Santa Rosa, CA 4575 5- 7-0 150 4725 $800.00 5 Nakashima, Tracy - Hilo, HI 4445 6- 5-1 195 4640 $700.00 6 Lou, Alvin - El Cajon, CA 4393 7- 5-0 210 4603 $600.00 7 Bruihl, Gene - Petaluma, CA 4360 7- 5-0 210 4570 $550.00 8 Reyes, Tony - San Jose, CA 4399 4- 8-0 120 4519 $520.00 9 Laster, Bob - Bullhead City, AZ 4345 5- 7-0 150 4495 $500.00 10 Pojas, Chad - Kapolei, HI 4264 6- 6-0 180 4444 $480.00 11 Horiuchi, Chad - Waipahu, HI 4244 5- 6-1 165 4409 $460.00 12 Kim, Lance - Wahiawa, HI 4214 3- 9-0 90 4304 $450.00
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Carmen Salvino Analyzes: Bob Glass

by PBA Editor April 22, 2002 19:00
Over the last two years, Bob Glass has become the player to beat on the PBA Senior Tour. Here, he talks with Hall of Famer Carmen Salvino about thinking like a researcher… how the game passed him by… and how he got it back. Carmen Salvino, a PBA Hall of Famer and USA Bowling Gold Level Instructor, recently chatted with two-time, defending PBA Senior Player of the Year Bob Glass. Glass, a six-time senior champ, is gearing up for the 2002 PBA Senior Tour, beginning Friday in Chillicothe, Ohio.
THE “RESEARCHER” Carmen Salvino: Bob, let’s talk a little bit, in my opinion, about the strength of you game. Bob Glass: OK. CS: The reason why I think you have a lot of strength in your game, mental strength, is because of your background in research and development. Correct? BG: Yes, I’ve done a lot of research. (Glass has a PhD in economics. He retired two years ago as a researcher with the University of Kansas Institute for Public Policy and Business Research). CS: People that do research tend to have a lot of patience and do not get very emotional about things when they work, or don’t work. And, they have to be very observant, astute, and be able to recognize patterns. All these things, I really believe have helped you understand the strategy of these bowling patterns that are out there in the present day conditions. You have an analytical mind that is picking up the whole picture, not just part of it like a lot of bowlers do. BG: I hope so. CS: I know from doing my own research the last 10 years that has helped me look at the lanes differently. I’m sure you have the ability more so than I, because you’ve done it longer.
HE GOT (CUSTOM) GAME BG: Carmen, one of the things that I’ve found with people is that they start getting this idea that there is one “right” way to do something… this is the way bowling is supposed to be. No. Bowling is knocking down pins. They give you a condition. They give you the pins. You find the equipment. You get the shoes. You knock down the pins. That’s the problem. CS: You’re right, but the problem is bowling has to be customized technically for the individual. That’s the key to bowling. First of all, you have to understand a bowler’s personality. If you don’t understand their personality, you can’t even help them technically. BG: Personality is really important. I learned this lesson a long time ago. Bob Handley, Bryan Goebel and I, all grew up in the same bowling center. Bob Handley was five years after me. Goebel was about 15 years after me. Handley hooked the ball when he was 12 years old. He had that same stalking approach. I wanted to throw a powerful ball. I wanted to throw the hook, too, but I could not deal with Handley’s game. I mentally cannot deal with 6-2, four-in-a-row, 5-3. My mind cannot deal with that. My game is not designed to throw eight-in-a-row. My game is designed for one open and 220. I need to pick up my spares. If I miss a couple of spares, it freaks me out a lot more than leaving back-to-back, solid 8-pins. I need to be hitting the pocket. Even though people think that I have an aggressive power game, my game is actually conservative. My game is designed first to get to the pocket, stay in the pocket, figure out a way to carry, figure out a way to go pair-to-pair so I don’t waste half a game getting lined up. I need to get lined up real fast. Now, I can’t get lined up as quickly as a left hander, but when I’m bowling really well… I’m bowling like a left hander. I’m going pair-to-pair, making very slight adjustments. So, in that sense my game is mentally designed to deal with the sort of conservative nature I have. I can’t deal with erratic scores and erratic bowling. Another one of the things that I’ve done over the years, is I have stolen so much from so many different people. That fits my personality. This is the way that I think. When things aren’t working for me, I’ll sit and think about it. If I don’t come up with an idea very quickly, I’m going to look around to see who has figured it out. You really have to be open-minded when you bowl. You have to be able to look around and see what’s working. I can’t throw the ball like Billy Hardwick or like Dick Weber. But, I can make my game similar enough that I can play that shot adequately enough until something comes around that I can do better. Again, that’s the conservative nature of my personality sort of dictating the way my physical game is.
TURNING DATA INTO “FEEL” BG: My physical game has a lot of lackness in it. I’m large. When large people make little mistakes, they’re larger than when little people make little mistakes. So, I have built into my game the ability to deal with small mistakes. I don’t have to throw the ball perfect every time. I just have to throw it well. I’m not John Handegard. If I don’t hit two boards, I don’t throw a fit. My game is designed to play three boards and generate some area out on the lane. If the condition is flat, I try to go from two to three boards. I try to figure out a way to give myself some play in the track. I try to find some way that I can get away with little mistakes. So my little mistakes are two pins, not 2-10s… four pins, not 4-10s. If I make a little mistake, I don’t get killed. And, if I throw the ball well, I have a good chance to strike. It’s hard for me, mentally, to deal with three open frames in a row. I’ll get mad, and I’ll get frustrated. For example, I’ve left eight, 10-pins in-a-row. I’ve left three, solid 8-pins in-a-row. I get frustrated, but I can deal with that. Now, if I have three open frames in-a-row and I don’t know where the first ball is going…when I get confused, I’m in trouble. Being confused is the worst thing that can happen to me on the lanes. CS: Bob, that’s a researcher’s mind. A researcher could live with not succeeding today, as long as he understands what the problem is. A researcher has to know what he’s doing. If the problem is so complex, and he has too many unknowns, then he gets frustrated and has to step back. That is unacceptable to a researcher… to be that lousy and not know what you’re doing out there. Is that fair, Bob? BG: That’s exactly right. And, that’s also the way I deal with research. CS: Research is patience and time and the ability to observe patterns. Sometimes, there is not an equation to figure something out. If you don’t understand every component in the system, you can’t change the system. Once you understand all the components, you can systematically change your shot, change the game, change your approach. Whatever you want to do, but you’re doing it with knowledge. You’re not doing it with feel. What is feel? Feel is wonderful to have. You don’t want to lose feel in sports. But, you need to have knowledge first. BG: Feel is real important when I’m bowling well. When everything is working, when you’re lined up, when you have the right ball – that’s when feel is really important. I try to work to the point where I can just relax and go with feel. You always have to stay alert. You always have to be paying attention. Some guys can just walk in and do it. I can’t. I have to walk in, sort things out, and figure out what’s going to work. If you notice in the tournaments, the first day of qualifying, I rarely am in the top five. Even after the second day, I’ll be anywhere from 10th-15th. The longer I bowl on lanes, the better chance I have. CS: And then later on in the tournament, you can throw it into feel. Because, you collected all the data. BG: Didn’t you notice that when you bowled, Carmen? After you worked out the problem, you get to the last day of the tournament and you just know what you’re doing. Then, you just let it kick in. CS: Yeah. Very few tournaments that I won did I ever lead from the beginning. I’d shoot big somewhere after a period of time. That’s when all the data came in. Once I was able to put all the pieces together, that’s when I could relax. Then, the feel took over. And from then on, it was “Hollywood” time (laughs). BG: It’s fun to figure it all out. But, it’s also fun to just relax and do it. I’ve always thought one of the great things about bowling is the physical feel of the game. That’s one of the things I fell in love with. When everything is going the way you want, it just feels so good. CS: When I throw the ball right, I feel like it’s music. When the ball is going down the lane, I can hear it humming. When the ball crashes into the pins, it’s like the crescendo. When you throw that super shot, it’s all musical. That’s the excitement of the sport.
SENIOR SUCCESS CS: Bob, you’ve unquestionably had more success over the last couple of years than anyone on the Senior Tour. What have been the keys to your success? BG: Here’s one of the things that really helped me. I bowled my first four senior stops and all I did was complain about my carry. I called Steve Wunderlich, who I traveled with in the ‘70s and ‘80s. He was working at Track. I asked him about the new equipment, because there was a period of about 1 1/2 years (just before turning 50)where my back was bad and I bowled very little and didn’t keep up with anything. Steve explained the equipment to me and started sending me Track equipment. I learned that stuff and that started in 1998-99. Then in 1999, for the first time in my life, I really had a lot of equipment. I didn’t have anything else that worked. All of the sudden, in 1999, I had a lot of equipment and I experimented around – and for the first time since the Yellow Dot – I felt like I had a pretty good idea about what bowling balls did. And, then Track put me on their staff. The advantage of being able to go out to the “truck,” get a ball drilled the second day after you've bowled and think, “I want to bowl like this, but I don’t have a ball that will allow me to do that." So, you go out and say, "here I want the ball drilled like this," I know which ball I want and I know exactly how I want it drilled. You go out and throw the ball and it does what you expect it to. Being on the Track staff is much more of an advantage than I thought it would be – along with understanding the bowling balls. I think that really helped me a lot. The game changed so much in the ‘90s that it really passed me by, mentally. I had to catch up and it was a fairly difficult process. I mean, I was pretty close physically to the other guys. But, it was the ability to manipulate the bowling balls that made me really competitive. Equipment is so dominant now. Don’t you think it is, Carmen? CS: Yes. The way I look at things to put the equipment in perspective – you take two bowlers of equal ability. You put a lot of oil out there. You give one guy a White Dot and you give the other guy one of these newer balls that hooks. Well, good luck to the guy with the White Dot. Now, you turn around and take all the oil off the lane. You give the guys the same two balls. Good luck to the guy with the hooking ball, who can’t get it past the dovetails before it starts hooking. The ball will be in the left gutter. So, yes, that tells me equipment is important. Do I need to say more? BG: (laughs) CS: I don’t care how good you are. If you want to bowl me on oil with a White Dot, bring your paycheck! But, Bob, you deserve credit for being able to recognize there was a problem in your game with understanding equipment. You went out and got the education and became smart enough to pick the right equipment for the right condition. That’s a part of strategy that’s very difficult because the ball is so important on today’s condition because there are so many variables. The lanes break down faster than they ever did, so the ball becomes very important. So, obviously, if you are not astute about the ball, I don’t care how good you are physically, someone could beat you with a less physical game and a better knowledge of bowling balls and strategy. BG: That’s one of the things about the Senior Tour. There are not any ball reps out there. You have to know your game and you have to know what equipment is going to work for you in particular circumstances. As you say, Carmen, it’s all individual.
BOWLING SCARED CS: Why were you not able to compete with the best of them when you were younger, and now you’re competing with the best seniors and winning? BG: For one, I’m in better physical shape than most of them. I’ve taken care of myself for the past 25 years. I go to the gym a lot. CS: That’s the key. They passed you up on the calendar. A lot of people don’t really understand what age really is. A lot of people relate to age by the calendar. But, I relate to age by the way a guy walks, by the way he moves, his reflexes, the way he thinks. You’re younger than they are. BG: Yeah. But, for one individual tournament it doesn’t make much difference. But, it plays its role. It’s the ability to practice, bowl 10-15 games a night and not be tired enough to fall into bad habits. That really helps me. CS: Absolutely. Physically, you are better than they are. But also now because of all the years you studied, mentally you are better also. This gives you a combined edge. That’s what’s made you successful on the Tour. BG: One other thing helped, too. I never won a national Senior Tour event until I lost my job. When I lost my job 23 months ago, bowling took on a much more serious nature. That’s how I’ve supported myself. CS: It gave you that little extra motivation you needed (laughs). BG: A couple of guys have said, "You know, Bob, it doesn’t look like you’re under any more pressure when you have to make a shot than you are when you are bowling qualifying." The truth is, I start out a tournament scared now. I’m right there on edge from the very beginning. CS: It’s done you a service in terms of motivation. You probably started off a little too relaxed before. Now you’re not going to allow yourself to hopefully wait for the last block to make the finals. Now that you need the money, you’re going to make the finals from the first frame on. You think differently. BG: Needing the money really focuses the mind. CS: Before if you had a cushion it was like, “Well I made it. Fine. I’m having a good time.” Now, a good time isn’t the only thing that’s going to happen. You want to eat. BG: (laughs) I’ve had more success in the last two years than I ever dreamed. I was surprised with the year I had in 2000. I thought that would not happen again. But, last year was actually better than the year before. In some sense, I’ve done better than I thought I was really capable of doing. These guys out on the Senior Tour beat me up 20 years ago. CS: They’re 20 years older now. You’re not. You’ve only aged about 12. BG: (laughs)
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