Voss Ends Ballard's Triple Crown Chase

by PBA Editor March 6, 2003 19:00
Hall of Famer Brian Voss again rose to the challenge in his Round of 32 match in the 2003 Professional Bowlers Association (PBA) World Championship at Taylor Lanes Friday afternoon. Voss, Atlanta, advanced to the next round with a four-games-to-three victory over Del Ballard Jr., N. Richland Hills, Texas. Ballard was looking for a career Triple Crown with a win at the World Championship, but was denied by Voss in seven games. “These guys just love to push me to the limit,” he said. “I’d rather have won in four games, but I’ll take the win any way I can get it.” Voss dropped the first game to Ballard before winning the next two. Ballard answered back with wins in games four and six, with Voss failing to strike in the 10th frame to win both matches. Voss answered the call in game seven, winning the game 242-239, and the match 4-3. “The first four days really prepared me for this moment,” said Voss, who faces Dave D’Entremont in the Round of 16. “I don’t anticipate anything easy for the rest of the tournament. Everybody wants to win this week.” Former PBA National Champion David Traber, Woodstock, Ill., and Amleto Monacelli, Venezuela, swept their opponents in the Round of 32. Traber advanced 4-0 over leading qualifier Mike DeVaney, Escondido, Calif., while Monacelli took care of 2002 U.S. Open champ Mika Koivuniemi, Finland, 4-0. Other winners from the afternoon session were Steve Wilson, Bryan Goebel, Tony Reyes, Randy Weiss, Dale Traber, Rick Steelsmith, Eric Forkel, Brian Kretzer, Dennis Horan Jr., Randy Weiss, Mike Scroggins, and Jack Jurek. The top 16 players advance for another round of best-of-seven games matches at 7 p.m. The season’s top eight point earners await the eight survivors for the Super 16 round Saturday at Taylor Sportsplex. Saturday’s best-of-five match play will trim the field from 16, to eight, to four. The semifinalists will compete for the title and the $120,000 first prize Sunday. ESPN will televise the finals live on Sunday, March 9, from 12:30-2 p.m. (ET).
HOW THEY'RE SEEDED Saturday's Super 16 #1 Walter Ray Williams Jr. vs. #8 surviving highest preliminary qualifier #5 Ryan Shafer vs. #4 surviving highest preliminary qualifier ---------- #3 Norm Duke vs. #6 surviving highest preliminary qualifier #7 Pete Weber vs. #2 surviving highest preliminary qualifier ---------- ---------- #8 Danny Wiseman vs. #1 surviving highest preliminary qualifier #4 Tommy Delutz Jr. vs. #5 surviving highest preliminary qualifier ---------- #6 Parker Bohn III vs. #3 surviving highest preliminary qualifier #2 Chris Barnes vs. #7 surviving highest preliminary qualifier
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64 Left In Contention for World Title

by PBA Editor March 5, 2003 19:00
With 20 games of qualifying completed, the field was trimmed to the top 64 players at the 2003 Professional Bowlers Association (PBA) World Championship at Taylor Lanes on Wednesday. Leading the pack is Mike DeVaney, Escondido, Calif. He averaged 220.9 in qualifying, and posted a 4,418 total to lead for the third straight round. Despite rolling three games under 200, including a 151 game, DeVaney says he’s confident with his game. “Being in the lead definitely makes it easier to bowl tomorrow,” he said. “But as far as I’m concerned, the tournament doesn’t begin until match play. I’ll be ready.” Hanging on in second place is Steve Hoskins, Tarpon Springs, Fla. The 10-time titlist had a consistent round en route to a 4,394 score. His high game of the day was 212, with a low game of 191. “Today was about maintaining the pace, and not doing anything to lose ground,” he said. “Obviously I would have been happy with leading the tournament, but I’m pleased that I could just maintain my standing.” In third place is Brad Angelo, Lockport, N.Y. The 33-year-old is the leading candidate for Rookie of the Year honors, and has a 4,372 total for 20 games. Fourth place belongs to Steve Wilson, Lake Worth, Fla., at 4,371. The four-time PBA champion’s win was last season in Erie, Pa. Rounding out the top five were Tommy Jones, Greenville, S.C., and Patrick Allen, Tarrytown, N.Y. The two players are tied with 4,359, and have identical 217.95 averages in qualifying. There was a tie for the 64th and final spot to advance to the next round of competition. Jeff Carter, Springfield, Ill., and Paul Koehler, Stuart, Fla., rolled a one-game tie breaker for the final spot. Carter won the match, 258-172 to advance. The 64 bowlers will return Friday at 8 a.m. for five more games of qualifying. Only the top 32 will advance to Friday afternoon’s best-of-seven-games match play, which begins at 1 p.m. The top 16 players advance for another round of best-of-seven games matches at 7 p.m. The season’s top eight point earners await the eight survivors for the Super 16 round Saturday at Taylor Sportsplex. Saturday’s best-of-five match play will trim the field from 16, to eight, to four. The semifinalists will compete for the title and the $120,000 first prize Sunday. ESPN will televise the finals live on Sunday, March 9, from 12:30-2 p.m. (ET).
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Schreyer Takes On Commissioner Duties

by PBA Editor March 5, 2003 19:00
The Professional Bowlers Association (PBA) has announced that its Chief Operating Officer and General Counsel, Fred Schreyer, has been named Commissioner effective immediately. Schreyer has been with the PBA full-time since October, 2002, but has been with the league since September, 2000 as its legal counsel. He has over 23 years in the sports industry including Director of Sports Marketing at Nike from 1987-1992 and the founder of Nike’s Sports Management division in 1992. “The original design was to have a Commissioner similar to other major sports leagues,” said Steve Miller, PBA President and CEO. “I have been assuming a lot of those responsibilities during the last year and as we continued with our rapid growth and expansion it became apparent that Fred’s expertise was needed in a larger role. Schreyer will continue to oversee the Marketing, Corporate Communications, Legal and Television departments. He will report to Miller and the PBA Board of Directors. “I’m thrilled to be able to increase and diversify my role within the PBA,” said Schreyer. “The tremendous growth in the last two years has just begun to scratch the surface on what we can accomplish.” Miller remains as President and CEO, focusing on growth strategies and financial investments. He will oversee sales and sponsorships, operations and finance. Schreyer was a partner in the law firm of Rosenfeld, Meyer & Susman in Beverly Hills from 1979-1987 before moving on to his seven-year career at Nike. Most recently, he was the Founding Partner and Owner of Pyramid Sports in which he served as a consultant to many of the leading companies in the sports business (Logo Athletic, Met-Rx, adidas and Arizona State University) and represented individuals in a variety of activities (Troy Aikman, Jason Williams and Gary Payton). The PBA Tour will have its season-ending World Championship this week in Taylor, Mich. This season the PBA Tour continued to increase its television ratings, added several new sponsors, increased membership and tournament entries. For more information on the PBA, log on to www.pba.com. For more information contact: Beth Marshall, PBA, 206-654-6007 or beth.marshall@pba.com
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World Championship Festivities Continue

by PBA Editor March 5, 2003 19:00
The bowling center at the Detroit Athletic Club received a special treat during the 2003 PBA World Championship in Taylor, Mich. The top eight point-earners from the 2002-03 season visited the 115-year-old club for two days of Pro-Am sessions. The DAC is home of one of the country's largest private bowling programs. Club members were treated to upgraded Pro-Am festivities on their home track. Along with receiving a bowling ball, the club members were treated to an exclusive session on the lanes with the pros, and a luncheon after competition. “We are ecstatic that the top players on Tour could come and spend time with us,” said Tom Reaume, DAC director of bowling operations. “Our club president, Mike Cleary jokingly says that bowling here is a socially required activity. We’re glad that the PBA decided to join us and our members.” The DAC facility itself is a gem among the revitalized downtown theatre district in the shadows of Detroit’s Comerica Park and Ford Field. The current facility was built in 1915 with six lanes in the basement. Another pair was added in the 1930s. Along with a bowling center, the seven-story structure houses guest rooms, libraries, an indoor swimming pool, men's and women's locker rooms, exercise rooms, offices, a barber shop, squash, racquetball and handball courts. Bowling has been a part of the club since its inception in 1887. Last year the bowling area, affectionately known as Bowler’s Abbey, received a face-lift that neared the $1 million mark. The 45-day project called for a sea of wood paneling, which is incorporated into the center’s support pillars, masking units, and even retro benches. “Woodwork is a main focus here at the club,” said Reaume. “So when we remodeled, we allowed that aura to expand into the center.” The woodwork even expanded to the 10 video monitors behind the bowling area and the newly installed automatic scorers. “If this is the basement, the top floor has to be awesome,” said Parker Bohn III upon entering the center. “I’ve been in my share of centers around the world, and I haven’t seen a center quite like this.” The same amenities available to the 4,300 members of the club were available to the pros. That meant valet service to the facility, first-class dining, and tended facilities normally seen only in country clubs and golf courses. “It’s phenomenal how comfortable this place is,” said Norm Duke. “I know they offer a lot of activities here, but they certainly cater to the bowler’s needs very well.” “It’s a facility that’s like no other,” said Reaume. “When the AMF scoring technicians were here, they were telling us about how they put a scoring system on the lanes at the White House. And they told us that the White House was cool, but it had nothing on the Detroit Athletic Club.”
HOW THEY'RE SEEDED Saturday's Super 16 #1 Walter Ray Williams Jr. vs. #8 surviving highest preliminary qualifier #5 Ryan Shafer vs. #4 surviving highest preliminary qualifier ---------- #3 Norm Duke vs. #6 surviving highest preliminary qualifier #7 Pete Weber vs. #2 surviving highest preliminary qualifier ---------- ---------- #8 Danny Wiseman vs. #1 surviving highest preliminary qualifier #4 Tommy Delutz Jr. vs. #5 surviving highest preliminary qualifier ---------- #6 Parker Bohn III vs. #3 surviving highest preliminary qualifier #2 Chris Barnes vs. #7 surviving highest preliminary qualifier E-Mail this PBA.com columnist
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Ten Striking Questions with Lonnie Waliczek: Part II

by PBA Editor March 4, 2003 19:00
If you could’ve picked two players to win multiple titles at the beginning of the season, would Lonnie Waliczek have been one of the picks? It doesn’t matter. He’s already done it. Sunday at the Odor-Eaters Open he joined Walter Ray Williams Jr. as the only two-time winner this season. PBA.com’s George Wooten sat down with Waliczek during the 2003 PBA World Championship and chatted about Blood and Guts, his new cell phone, and his experiences as an extreme athlete. Q: Congratulations on winning in Louisville. Do you always bowl well in towns that start with the letter “L”? Well, yeah. My first name starts with an “L”, so naturally I would bowl well in towns that start with the letter “L”. Q: Did the second title compare to the first one in any way? In a lot of ways, the second title was easier. You know you’ve done it before, and the comfort factor was definitely higher going into the Louisville show than it was in Las Vegas. Q: Before you rolled your first shot on the ESPN finals, you made reference to Nugget. Who would that be? Nugget is my daughter. When she was first crawling and walking, you’d look at here and the first thing you’d think is, “She’s a nugget.” It was just her shape and the way she was. Now she’s a little kid, not so much a nugget anymore. Q: Right after you won in Louisville, you made the 350-mile drive to Taylor for the World Championship. What was in the CD player while you were driving? There was no music playing. We played a card game called Blood and Guts on the way up, and I got my butt kicked. Jason Duran and my brother Brian drove. It was a hard-core card game. Q: We hear you joined the 21st Century recently by purchasing a cellular phone. What took you so long? I don’t know… apathy. It was never really necessary. Except for calling home, I don’t make a lot of calls. After Vegas, it seemed like I was missing calls, so I thought it was time to get one. Q: What would you say are the strengths and weaknesses of your game right now? I think my strength is that I’m able to do enough things right now to create a good ball reaction. I still want to be a better straight player. I’m not near the level of the best straight players out here. Q: What was the craziest thing you ever did in your youth? I jumped off a couple of bridges into bodies of water. Well, actually it was one bridge and one cliff, and they were both between 50-80 feet high. I look back on that and I think, “What in the world was I doing?” Q: What things frustrate you the most when you bowl? Poor execution, plain and simple. Mostly when it stems from not having a clear picture when I step on the lane. Q: If you could change one thing about bowling, what would it be? I would want someone make the lefty-righty issue fair, or make it seem more fair. It seems like it’s a never-ending issue, and it’s one of the most unfortunate aspects of the sport. Q: What do you plan to do with your summer vacation? I plan to spend most of my time with my wife Amy and my daughter. We’re having a baby in July, so we have that to look forward to. Other than that, it’s just business as usual. I trained a lot last year, so I’ll do that again this year, and get ready to come back out next season. Ten Striking Questions Archive Pete Weber Chris Hayden Chris Barnes Walter Ray Williams Jr. Lonnie Waliczek: Part I Bryon Smith
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